Jason Larkin

Ascension Island, Ascension

A measuring instrument stands amidst shrubs near the summit of Green Mountain. Ascension is a popular spot for science studies since it sees so little day-to-day human activity. However, little has been studied about the 19th century work done by the Royal Navy on altering the ecosystems of the island. Ascension Island is a volcanic island in the equatorial Atlantic ocean, 1,600 kms from the coast of Africa and 2,250 km from the coast of South America. It is home to RAF Ascension Island, a British naval base, the Atlantic relay station for the BBC's World Service and one of the five antennae that are instrumental in the Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation system. In the 1850, with encouragement from Charles Darwin and under the auspices of Joseph Hooker, a botanist and director of the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, the Royal Navy was encouraged to import various types of trees to the island. They flourished and by the 1870s enough trees had grown on the highest peak, Green Mountain, to create a cloud forest which improved the islands fertility.

Part of story
Object Name
Copyright
Jason Larkin
City
Ascension Island
Country
Ascension
Restrictions
Max size
High Resolution
3000 x 3000 pixels
25.4 x 25.4 cm (300 dpi)
10 x 10 inch (300 dpi)
3.4 MB size on disk
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