Espen Rasmussen

Detroit, Michigan, USA

Text books lie on the floor of the abandoned St Rita Catholic School/Church. The population of Detroit has fallen from a high of 1,850,000 in 1950 to 701,000 in 2013. Many of its flourishing neighbourhoods were split by major freeway construction in the 1950s and 1960s. The impact was to make physical barriers which split and reduced these once thriving areas. The freeways also made commuting from suburban communities a more viable alternative to living within the city limits. After the 1967 riots, thousands of small businesses closed permanently or relocated to safer neighbourhoods, and the affected districts lay in ruins for decades. There are at least 70,000 abandoned buildings, 31,000 empty houses, and 90,000 vacant lots.Hard.Land is a journey through rust belt and blue collar America to meet the people struggling to keep the 'American Dream' alive: the middle class, the unemployed, the new poor, the workers on low or minimum wages and those who have had their benefits cut. Photographer Espen Rasmussen and journalist Roy Freddy Andersen travelled from Chicago to Detroit and on to Youngstown (OH), Beckley (WV), Williamsport (PA), ending their trip in New York. Their journey focuses on ordinary people and the consequences of globalisation, mechanisation and the growing gap between rich and poor in the US. The decline of industries such as car building in Detroit and mining in West Virginia have brought about a shift for millions of workers into low paid service jobs which is changing the social fabric of many parts of the US.

Part of story
Object Name
Copyright
Espen Rasmussen
City
Detroit, Michigan
Country
USA
Restrictions
Not available in Scandinavia
Max size
High Resolution
5000 x 3333 pixels
42.33 x 28.22 cm (300 dpi)
16.67 x 11.11 inch (300 dpi)
3.9 MB size on disk
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